Is ClearView Plus too good?

I’m just working through some images from a holiday. The images were taken in mountains with quite a lot of haze. The difference that just Clear View (and sometimes Smart Lighting makes) is amazing - applied to a raw image with the camera matching profile also applied. This is a before and after. I really like the way that the mountains in the distance become visible. My question - does the image look overprocessed. I submit images to an online stock library. They do not care very much about the subject matter but certain basics, exposure, focus and overprocessing matter. Does anyone have any



experience of Clear View and stock libraries?

Hi Justin. I agree with you CVP can really add something to certain landscapes and other non-people shots. Please don’ t ever use CVP on human skin(it produces weird skin-tones that are very unnatural) . I use it to good effect on non-human skin shots at level 20-30 instead of the garish default value of 50. It can cause haloing around objects projecting into the sky(if the level is set too high).

You will read the postings of some well-respected members here that will tell you “Never use CVP”. This is just their opinion which doesn’t agree with our opinion…Use it and enjoy!

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If you think it looks a little over processed, (and I agree), just lower the amount you applied a bit. Also check the amount of sharpness and contrast you may have added with other tools. New users of ClearView Plus do tend to over apply it in my experience.

Mark

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I find the default value for CVP is too much and always reduce it. I mostly use it with Control Lines to just affect the distant parts of the image or the sky with clouds. Sky with clouds really benefit from CVP. CVP is also useful to add a little local contrast to flat images.

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I quickly found the default level of ClearView Plus was waaay too much for my taste. Instead, I found a maximum of around ‘15’ was much better,

However, it wasn’t long before I found the extra fine contrast sliders that become available in PL when you (buy) activate FilmPack a much better alternative to ClearView Plus and these days I rarely use it.

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mother nature doesn’t make clouds with cutting sharp edge and insane details. every tools has their own perks, use at you discretion, if you think it’s too much than it might be. remember when HDR came out? now what are your thoughts a decade later when you look at them?

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Hi @KeithRJ - thanks. Yes; I’ve noticed really excellent results with skies. Maybe I will just use it mainly for skies. Thanks.

Hi @stuck - thanks. Do these extra sliders become available in the Selective Toning area? I wonder if I would get similar results with ColorEfEx Dynamic Contrast?

No, they appear under ‘Advanced settings’ in the ‘Contrast’ palette:
PL+FPadvancedSettingsContrastSliders

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The Fine Contrast slider which appears just above the Advanced Settings is also added by FilmPack. I am not certain whether or not your response may have confused @justinwyllie

By the way the three Highlights, Midtones and Shadows sliders are actually subsets of the Fine Contrast slider. As a general rule you would use the main Fine Contrast slider by itself or select one or more of the three Advanced sliders. Using the both the Fine Contrast slider and the advanced sliders at the same time will generally add more than desirable amounts of fine contrast and the results may be unpredictable.

Mark

It is a wonderful tool to boost contrast in many landscape scenes where haze is an issue, but it is also easy to overdo the enhancement.

By default for images I apply maybe +5 to +10 overall, and then I only add more using local adjustment (mainly Luminosity mask) on things like mountains and sky with clouds.