Author Topic: Happy Holidays  (Read 4643 times)

Jim Scott

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Happy Holidays
« on: December 05, 2014, 11:04:30 am »
Hello Forum!

Happy Holidays to You North & South. Thank You for all your informative posts & Best Wishes for another Year of making inspiring images.

Jim Scott

Attached image's snow courtesy of DxO Filmpack (and Photoshop for the compositing).


Keith_Reeder

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2014, 11:18:47 am »
I had my holidays in September, Jim - had a great time shooting Gannets off the English east coast, thanks.

I suppose you mean "Merry Christmas" - in which case thanks, and the same to you!

;)
Keith Reeder
Blyth, Northumberland, NE England

Win 8.1, AMD FX-4300 Quad Core 3.8GHz, Radeon R7260X, 16 gb RAM.

Willy

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2014, 06:29:05 pm »
I too wish all of you a Merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

I am a newbie on the forum. I was a very long time user of Capture One 3 till 8, but …. alas. Yet I am happy with DxO.

Kind regards,

Willy   

Bencsi

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2014, 10:09:50 pm »
Hi Jim,

 Nice pair of images in different season.

Let me also wish a nice year end incl. New Years Eve and Christmas.

Endre
Win7/64 PC, i7-3770, 3.9GHz, 24G RAM, Intel HD-4000 GPU, 27" calibrated LG monitor 1920*1080 px res. 82 DPI

Jim Scott

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2014, 07:22:43 am »
Hi Endre!

Possibly I misunderstood your note: but it's actually the same image, which was taken in June (Summertime where I live); note the shadows are identical... hence my reference to Filmpack & Photoshop.

Bencsi

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2014, 09:34:20 am »
That is what I told Jim. Two images in different seasons. Is it an incorrect description? You know, I'm not a native English speaking, therefore accept any advice from those countries where the people get English with breast milk from mother.

Endre
Win7/64 PC, i7-3770, 3.9GHz, 24G RAM, Intel HD-4000 GPU, 27" calibrated LG monitor 1920*1080 px res. 82 DPI

DxODexter

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2015, 04:52:12 am »
At first I thought that you have very precise tripod positioning, then noticed that it was the same image
little cloud streak gave it away first, then reading further on and shadows were mentioned

OK so how the hell did you do this with film pack ??  It really fooled me at first

A short tutorial would be great, Thanks
Dexter

Jim Scott

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2015, 06:57:05 am »
Hi Dexter!

In the next day or two, as time allows, I will post the process involved.

Jim

Jim Scott

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2015, 06:35:50 am »
Hi Dexter!

The following is the method I used for creating the snowy image effect:

Overview
---------------

A color image is converted to an "infrared" greyscale image in DxO Pro 10 (using the "FilmPack 3" app as a "plug-in" or "extension" with DxO Pro 10 as the host) and then composited with the color version in Photoshop.

Some side notes here...
In my experience there is no substitute for a real infrared filter for your camera.
However, there are times when a real filter is not practical (or to eliminate it from consideration if there isn't a filter that fits your camera). Instead You have to go with an emulation. This particular image falls into the impractical situation as there was a very slight breeze blowing which moved the leaves around - and one needs a pin tight registration for this effect.

The best infrared effect (filter or emulation) occurs when well lit green leaves and blue skies are in abundance in your images. Deep quarter tones are not suitable. A solid blue sky makes it easy to "pull a matte".

Also re-mentioning that I am using FilmPack 3, if You are using a different version "Step 1" below might have a variance from my result. In addition, FilmPack is not the only infrared "emulation" available, but in general, I have found the particular rendering I used to be the closest to a real IF filter.

Also - most importantly! - these steps are what I used for this image. Another image would probably have variations to the settings specified below... Experiment with your own creations.


("Original" image - Please see attachment "Orig_Image.png")


Step 1
-----------

Bring your original image into DxO, then select:
The "Color" Palette > Color Rendering > Category = Black & White Film; Rendering = Kodak HIE Filtered (High Speed Infrared).... the best emulation I've worked with.

I went with the default intensity of "100". Save as 16- bit TIFF.

(Please see attachment "Infrared.png")


******  (All the of the following steps now occur in Photoshop.)  ******


Step 2
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Open your original in Photoshop (of course, you could DxO this Raw file as well if needed).


Step 3
-----------

a) Import your DxO'd 16-bit infrared TIFF image into Photoshop.

b) Double-click this infrared layer which opens the "Layer Style" panel.

c) Under the "Blend If:" section:
    - "Grey" setting to improve the contrast.
    - "Blue" to bring back (mask) the sky.

(Please see attachment "Layer_Style.png")


Step 4
-----------

a) Create a "Black & White" adjustment layer (using the "Default" preset) on top of the infrared image.
b) Set the "Blending Mode" of this adjustment layer to "Soft Light".
c) Set the opacity of this adjustment layer to 50%.

These settings pop the color & contrast of the composite image (the look of a clear, crisp winter day).

Note: The "Black & White" adjustment layer has its own "Infrared" preset. Depending on the lighting, I find this preset can work well with portraits, when you desire a different look.


Step 5
-----------

a) Create a layer mask for the "Black & White" adjustment layer. I used this mask to selectively paint out the "too deep" shadows that are the result of using the "Black & White" filter set to "Soft Light", and so reveals the softer shadows from the original image. You can also attenuate the shadows using the "Layer Style" panel "Blend If: Grey" and pull the black point to the right (option-drag the black point to split it, which creates a "fuzzier" selection control that softens the effect.)

b) Create a layer mask for the "Infrared" layer. I used this mask to restore color from the underlying "original" image, such as here - the red shed, horse trailer, & house (in deep shadows on the right).

(Please see attachment "Layers.png")


===========================

We're done...
While your image may require different settings, you have a basis point from which to start.
As always - Experiment!
« Last Edit: April 14, 2015, 09:07:59 pm by Jim Scott »

DxODexter

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Re: Happy Holidays
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2015, 10:18:20 am »
Thanks Jim

That is a very complete tutorial, thanks for the effort, Ill give that a try very soon
Much appreciated

Cheers

 

photography