Author Topic: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL  (Read 2636 times)

BrianK

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PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« on: January 16, 2018, 07:21:33 pm »
I have a relatively high-end gpu running on the latest Windows update with an i7 quad core processor.

Somwhere in recent weeks, the software disabled, and will not enable, OpenCL, reporting that it does some kind of system check at startup and has determined that my system will not process as fast with OpenCL enabled.

I find this incredible given the capabilities of my gpu, which is an Nvidia Quadro P4000.

DXO places faith in its "new algorithm."  I am skeptical.

Anyone else experiencing this issue?

If you are able to enable OpenCL can you please give a brief thumbnail of your system (e.g. memory, cpu, gpu)?  Thanks.

John7

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2018, 08:38:27 pm »
I used to have open CL activated buy OP but PL hasn't. I di enable it but would be interested both  as to why it wasn't by default and if with PL will make it worth it?

I did a test with CL active and off and both were taking 13sec for disk exports.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 08:42:08 pm by John7 »

Pieloe

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2018, 10:14:24 am »

You must delete this file to force DPL to redo the compatibility test.
C: \ Users \ <user> \ AppData \ Local \ DxO \ DxO PhotoLab 1 \ ocl64.cache
 


GSB2

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2018, 08:17:40 am »
Was PL faster when you had OpenCL enabled though?

It seems PL just doesn't utilise GPU very well.

I have a GTX1070, the option to enable OpenCL is there, but not enabled by default.

sirraj

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2018, 01:14:13 pm »
I exported 30 Nikon D750 NEFs as 16 bit TIFs (all 6400 - 12,800 ISO) using Photolab Prime.

I ran this test with OpenCL disabled, the export took about 8 minutes and 30 seconds to complete. I ran the test again with OpenCl enabled, the export completed about 10 seconds faster.

I have a Ryzen 7 1800X processor, 16 Gb of RAM, and a Samsung 960 EVO SSD. My graphics card is a Radeon R9 390. Photolab was set to simultaneously process 8 files in the preferences.

Sirraj

GSB2

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2018, 01:22:12 pm »
I exported 30 Nikon D750 NEFs as 16 bit TIFs (all 6400 - 12,800 ISO) using Photolab Prime.

I ran this test with OpenCL disabled, the export took about 8 minutes and 30 seconds to complete. I ran the test again with OpenCl enabled, the export completed about 10 seconds faster.

I have a Ryzen 7 1800X processor, 16 Gb of RAM, and a Samsung 960 EVO SSD. My graphics card is a Radeon R9 390. Photolab was set to simultaneously process 8 files in the preferences.

Sirraj

If you used Prime noise reduction, this uses CPU not GPU and so the OpenCL setting not so relevant, as your result supports.

BrianK

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2018, 12:14:58 pm »
Following up on my own post . . .

Nvidia released a new driver for my GPU last week in part in response to the "Windows Fall Creators Update."  After downloading the new driver, the OpenCL option was enabled.  Likely then, the Windows update created the issue in PhotoLab.

I have no response to whether enabling OpenCL results in an improvement of PhotoLab performance over CPU processing on my system.  I suspect it will given that my GPU is a much newer, high-end GPU and my CPU, while once high end, is now a bit dated.  That said, I will keep an eye on it and post again if I see any notable change.

Bencsi

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2018, 06:05:47 pm »
My experience is: OpenCL helps to render the output image significantly during the Export processing if the Noise reduction mode is HQ only. There is no significant time difference for PRIME images. See the enclosed statistics on my system.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1RnSo8g87GAbSiCdyQX5tYf-IxjlFvct4

Endre

Win7/64 PC, i7-3770, 3.9GHz, 24G RAM, Intel HD-4000 GPU, 27" calibrated LG monitor 1920*1080 px res. 82 DPI

BrianK

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2018, 12:39:09 am »
Very interesting.  So if I am reading this correctly you are also not experiencing much advantage in just using PhotoLab (as distinguished from rendering).

Any thoughts on whether you would expect these results to vary by GPU?  Could a better GPU produce better results?  (Not casting shade on your GPU . . . just don't know where it stands amongst GPUs.)

Bencsi

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2018, 10:01:00 am »
The GPU I applied is a very basic one. My Intel i7 include a HD 4000 graphic chip, I thought a separate graphic card have to give any change. To prove it, installed on Win7 two gadgets, the CPU and GPU graph maker. started both v11 and PL app and rendered same images subsequently. Please find the graphs.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1wiSRGYyn4PgJ47ev7nc2sFXt3jMfpOCp

It seems, PL uses less GPU resource on same task. Probably the code has been rewritten.

Endre
Win7/64 PC, i7-3770, 3.9GHz, 24G RAM, Intel HD-4000 GPU, 27" calibrated LG monitor 1920*1080 px res. 82 DPI

Asser

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Re: PhotoLab will not engage OpenCL
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2018, 12:13:16 pm »
I had once a discussion with an Affinity Photo developer on why my GPU (GTX 1070) sleeps all the time, when I use their tool. He said, that GPU is used only for certain tasks like zooming. For rendering it does not make sense there, because the transfer times from Memory to GPU cache and back eat up the advantage over calculating on the CPU in the first place. A graphic software like Affinity Photo needs intermediate results often, so the transfer times sum up.

Games make it differently. They put the needed textures into the GPU cache at once or stream them in the background, then these are used on the GPU only and do not need to be brought back into RAM, where they can be accessed by the CPU. Maybe there are similar reasons in PL.

 

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